The Glass Eye
by NAPOLEON LAPATHIOTIS
translated by PANAYOTIS SFALAGAKOS

I am but a simple piece of glass, a small and insignificant coloured piece of glass—more like a lie within the great world—a piece of glass that they made—with skill, it is true—in order to act as a living eye, to its minutest detail, so that it can, when the other is absent, trick people into believing that it exists; however, coming unto this earth, thanks to the kindness of my craftsman, I, too, acquired my own story, which I can now tell, in the same, consistent way as any person—and, in fact, with some pride! Because, at the end of the day, not all coloured pieces of glass have such stories in their lives, worth the effort of telling them... My story is simple—yet so rare, and so sorrowful—that I should have watered, had I been alive, every time I remembered it again; that is why you should not smile, you, eyes that are strong and alive, that see, and are now reading me...

I do not remember, however, my life, except for the day we found ourselves together in a shop window with another fourteen pieces of glass, just like me, in a little open box, lined with cotton, placed in a row, with care, and in accordance with their hue—as each one of these had its own colour: The last on the right was a lively black, an eye with a pitch-dark pupil and with bright, glittering reflections. The one next to it was lighter. The ones further down were chestnut coloured, from wine-coloured chestnut to honey-coloured. Then there were the deep ashen, through the ashen-azure, the pale sea-blue. Last were all the blues. I was located between the honey-coloured and the ashen shades. I was an eye that was dark green—an eye that was exceptional, one of a kind, I think.

I do not know what devilish mood had made my craftsman colour me so green! Such eyes do not exist in people—or, if they do, they are so rare that many years must pass before you are able to meet the same! And yet, I, too, did find ‘my mate’, as you will see...

We were in the middle of the shop window, very, very close to the glass. Around us were other, alien, things—thermometers, barometers, binoculars and spectacles. There was also a big telescope, set up on a tripod, and all manner of machine and a wealth of instruments. We would talk at night, when it became silent and people were sleeping—and each one would say whatever was on its mind. There were also some travelled ones as well, which recounted great tales... I myself had nothing to say—because I had not come to know anything. I listened and studied, only.

Behind the glass of the shop window, which was a large, thick crystal glass, we would see people gazing—especially towards night-time, when they would turn on the lights. They gazed at us—and we at them. They would pass by, and would look at us, a crowd of people who were strange, some short and chubby, with inflated cheeks, and others tall, gaunt, like sticks, a pile of women and children. Most of those who looked at us shuddered! The reason why, we found out later. Our frigid countenance, our dreadful deathly stillness frightened them! And yet, they were not in the right—because even the littlest thing can have its very own life... What terrified them, I think, the most—as we later came to understand—was the very correct notion that for them to happen to need us, some misfortune would first have to meet them, they would have to lose their real eye. They might have been right about this, as well. I do not know how people think—I never managed to enter their minds—but I think that I am close to the truth.

Suddenly one day we became fewer—from the fifteen we had been, no more than ten remained! The five left, indeed, in a single day! Everyone, at the time, was uttering the word ‘war’ often... It appears that people, if they overfill the earth, and do not fit, start to kill each other with fury, cut off their arms and legs, do anything possible to become fewer, to become smaller, to become shorter—and thus be able to fit! Another explanation I could not find... And what explanation can a poor little piece of glass like me find? But why should they take their eyes out as well? By mistake? I do not understand...

And then we became even fewer in number. Seeing my brothers and sisters leaving one-by-one, I too felt a kind of lament! I had grown bored in the shop window, looking at the same old things, I wanted to jump into life, to sense movement and action, to mingle with people, to travel, to rejoice, to learn... My other brothers and sisters, I reckon, scoffed at me, they called me very ‘romantic’! And truly, I sought new emotions and adventures! The cause of that inertia, that horrible stagnation, I felt was my rare colour. Who could ever need me, with a colour so rare, so scarce, so as to come and deliver me?

And yet I was not right about this, either! I was not right to blame it on my luck, nor to curse my craftsman, who had condemned me, on account of my colour, to remain useless in the depths of my box, to not be able to be useful somewhere, to give, somewhere, some consolation, to leave my place, to live! Someone was indeed found, one day, for me as well!

He was a swarthy young man, laid up in hospital—a lad way up to there, with a bandage on his left eye, with a cloth, black and big, placed aslant across his forehead! He had lost his eye in that there ‘war’, from the fragmenting of a hand grenade—because people, as we were informed, also had machines to kill themselves, and this for greater ease...

They had brought him to the hospital, hit and maimed. He had remained in bed for five months, struggling with the reaper the first ten days. But, in the end, he managed to escape. I was taught all of this later through the words uttered by his own people, and also by him... I had not seen, since I had been alive, a young man so sweet and genial, with such a supple build! He walked on crutches, but afterwards left those behind as well. All that he got left with was a small hobble, which made you think lent him some new grace as well. I loved him, the instant I saw him!

When we first went out into the street, everyone turned their head and looked at us! I was, honestly, so well-matched with his other eye, his alive one! I was proud about my good fortune...

I came to know his native place, his house, his old mother and his brothers and sisters. Our life was moving along just fine, and seemed to be moving along quietly. I, too, started to become bolder...

However, in the meantime, I had begun to feel something else: My mate—his living eye—would often look at me in the mirror, would look at me aslant, and hated me! Instead of it, too, being proud about having found my good company, about having so successfully chanced upon its mate—it would look at me aslant and hate me! It seems that it would remember its living partner, and could not forget it! The image of its living partner that it would see in me was that of a woeful forgery—and it could not get used to me...

And what… and what did I not do, to console it, to sweeten its profound sorrow! It would always look at me embittered, it would regard me as an interloper and as a fraud, as a tragic parody of its other companion, the one that had already left, and it would secretly water, and hated me! In vain, I would assume the shine and expression of its lost living eye, and made like to emulate its sparkles! The better I acted in my role, the more the other eye hated me!

This thing could not last. I felt myself a stranger, without hope of us ever being reconciled. I was like a fateful companion, but very bitter and unwanted. Our ‘marriage’, despite the similarity of colour and proportion, was an ‘infelicitous’ one... And the discontent would come over me as well—even though I, even unhappier, could not even water!

Then I remembered my paper box again, the one lined with cotton in the shop window. I became nostalgic for my quiet, carefree life, in the faraway corner of the shop, back then when no one would ask for me, back then when a thick sheet of crystal had been put in place between me and the world—for our own good, it seems—and separated us...

And the eye would look at me in the mirror, and would melt, more and more every day. I would see it languish, every day, lose its brilliance and warmth, wither slowly, like an ailing flower... And the beautiful, swarthy young man, with the rare, green eyes, after a fever fit, a brief and incurable illness, died one night, suddenly...

I observed the drama of his death. Our two fates were conjoined, conjoined beyond death! I observed all of his agony, until his final breath. I felt the chill of his death, the frigid rigidity of his body. I heard the weeping of his mother, the sobs and the shrieks. I observed his tragic funeral—up to the time they buried us together...And then an extremely deep silence spread around me, for years. In the earth, where they had put us, nothing could be heard, absolutely nothing! Everybody by then had forgotten us...

And one night, I rolled into the depths of the skull—and stayed, for years, in there. I reckoned that I, too, had died...

I stayed, I know not how many years, in the deep and endless darkness; many or few I cannot say, nor was I able to find out... I reflected, in my loneliness, on the times I had gazed at the faraway shop window, with the short and the fat people, and with the others, the tall ones and the lean ones, along with my other glass brothers, amongst the thermometers and the microscopes! I would see, all of this, as though in a dream, in my heavy and dark sleep, which seemed to me to be inexhaustible and endless—and how it would now last forever...

And then again, for some time, I was left without dreams. I had got used to the darkness. I had neither a lust for life, nor the hope of waking...

And suddenly, at a point when I did not expect it—after I do not know how many years of muteness, blackness and death—one day, I found myself once again in the light!

I heard, at first, some faraway sounds, some thumps, hollow and muffled, which I could not explain. These thumps approached closer and closer, until they reached the place where I was located... And then, suddenly, I saw the sun! I remained dazed at the beginning, as though I were a living eye—and without knowing what was happening...

Why they were digging us out, I never did learn. I saw the brothers and sisters of the young man, gathered around. The old mother no longer existed. I never did learn what became of her.

They found me inside the depths of the skull, and they took me out with teary eyes...

Then I remembered the handsome lad again, in all of his living beauty! I remembered his swarthy face, which was very pale and yet candid, and his supple stature! I remembered his black hair and his charming hobble! And then I remembered my partner, the good eye that hated me... Of all of these nothing remained—nothing other than a bag of bones, stacked up and yellowed...

And the good eye, which had hated me, no longer existed either! Nothing existed but I—now a remnant, the sole remnant, of such vivacity and such manliness!

Nothing existed but I—the insignificant and lifeless little piece of glass, the poor little piece of glass, the dead one—living, and reminding people of the beautiful lad, who did not live, and of his big green eyes—as well as the one that had left, that had been lost, the one that I never met, and also the other one, the good one, the living one, the eye that was thoughtless and ungrateful, which within its woeful blindness did not ever wish to understand my true worth, nor was it ever able, so long as it lived, to love me—and to forgive me…





Το γυαλένιο μάτι

Δεν είμαι παρά ένα απλό γυαλί, ένα μικρό και ασήμαντο χρωματιστό γυαλί, –ένα ψέμα πιο πολύ, μες στο μεγάλον κόσμο,– ένα γυαλί, που το ’φκιασαν –με τέχνη, είν’ αλήθεια– να παρασταίνει ένα μάτι ζωντανό, ως τις πιο μικρές του λεπτομέρειες, για να μπορεί, όταν εκείνο λείπει, να ξεγελάει τους ανθρώπους πως υπάρχει –κι όμως, ερχόμενο σ' αυτή τη γη, χάρη στην καλοσύνη του τεχνίτη μου, απόχτησα κι εγώ την ιστορία μου, και μπορώ τώρα να την πω, όμοια κι απαράλλαχτα σαν άνθρωπος, –και μάλιστα, με κάποια υπερηφάνεια! Γιατί, στο κάτω-κάτω της γραφής, όλα τα χρωματιστά γυαλιά δεν έχουν τέτοιες ιστορίες στη ζωή τους, που ν' αξίζει τον κόπο να τις πούνε... Η δική μου ιστορία είν’ απλή, –μα τόσο σπάνια, και τόσο θλιβερή, που θα ’πρεπε να δάκρυζα, αν ήμουν ζωντανό, κάθε φορά που την ξαναθυμάμαι: γι’ αυτό δεν πρέπει να χαμογελάτε, σεις, τα μάτια τα γερά και ζωντανά, που βλέπετε, και τώρα με διαβάζετε...

Δε θυμάμαι, ωστόσο, τη ζωή μου, παρά απ’ την ημέρα που βρεθήκαμε μαζί σε μια βιτρίνα μαγαζιού με άλλα δεκατέσσερα γυαλάκια, σαν και μένα, σ' ένα μικρό κουτάκιανοιχτό, στρωμένο με βαμπάκι, βαλμένα στη σειρά, με προσοχή, και σύμφωνα με το χρωματισμό τους· γιατί καθένα απ’ αυτά είχε και το χρώμα το δικό του: Το τελευταίοδεξιά ήταν ένα μαύρο ζωηρό, ένα μάτι με κόρη κατασκότεινη και με λαμπρές στιλπνές αντανακλάσεις. Το διπλανό του ήταν ανοιχτότερο. Τα παρακάτω ήταν καστανά, απ’ το κρασάτο καστανό ως το μελένιο. Ύστερα ήταν τα βαθιά σταχτιά, μέχρι το σταχτογάλανο, τ’ ωχρό το θαλασσί. Τα τελευταία ήταν όλα γαλανά. Εγώ βρισκόμουν ανάμεσα μελένια και σταχτιά.Ήμουν ένα μάτι σκούρο πράσινο, –ένα μάτι εξαιρετικό, μοναδικό στο είδος του, πιστεύω.

Δεν ξέρω ποια διαβολεμένη όρεξη έκανε τον τεχνίτη μου να με χρωματίσει τόσο πράσινο! Τέτοια μάτια δεν υπάρχουν στους ανθρώπους, –ή, κι αν υπάρχουν, είναι τόσο σπάνια, που πρέπει να περάσουν πολλά χρόνια για να μπορέσεις ν' απαντήσεις όμοια! Και όμως βρήκα, κι εγώ, τον "άνθρωπό" μου, καθώς θα δείτε...

Είμαστε στη μέση της βιτρίνας, κοντά-κοντά στο τζάμι. Γύρω μας ήταν άλλα, ξένα πράγματα, –θερμόμετρα, βαρόμετρα, κιάλια και ματογυάλια. Ήταν κι ένα μεγάλο τηλεσκόπιο, στημένο σ’ ένα τρίποδο, και μηχανές λογής-λογής και πλήθος εργαλεία. Μιλούσαμε τη νύχτα, όταν γινόταν σιωπή κι οι άνθρωποι κοιμόντουσαν, –κι έλεγε το καθένα τα δικά του. Ήταν και μερικά ταξιδεμένα, που διηγότανε ωραίες ιστορίες... Εγώ δεν είχα τίποτα να πω, –γιατί δεν είχα τίποτα γνωρίσει. Άκουγα και σπούδαζα, μονάχα.

Πίσω από το τζάμι της βιτρίνας, ένα μεγάλο κρύσταλλο παχύ, –ιδίως όταν άναβαν τα φώτα, προς το βράδυ,– βλέπαμε τους ανθρώπους να χαζεύουν. Εκείνοι χάζευαν μ' εμάς, –κι εμείς μ' αυτούς. Περνούσαν, και μας κοίταζαν, ένα πλήθος άνθρωποι παράξενοι, άλλοι κοντοί και παχουλοί, με φουσκωμένα μάγουλα, κι άλλοι ψηλοί, ξερακιανοί, σα στέκες, ένα σωρό γυναίκες και παιδιά. Οι πιο πολλοί που μας κοιτούσαν, ανατρίχιαζαν! Το γιατί, το μάθαμε αργότερα. Τους τρόμαζε το παγωμένο ύφος μας, η φοβερή μας νεκρική ακινησία! Κι όμως δεν είχαν δίκιο: γιατί και το πιο μικρούλι πράμα μπορεί να’ χει τη δική του τη ζωή... Το περισσότερο, νομίζω, που τους τρόμαζε, –όπως καταλάβαμε αργότερα,– ήταν η πολύ σωστή ιδέα, πως για να τύχει να μας χρειαστούνε, θα ’πρεπε πρώτα να τους βρει μια συμφορά, να χάσουν το πραγματικό τους μάτι. Και σ' αυτό μπορεί και να ’χαν δίκιο. Δεν ξέρω πώς σκέπτονται οι άνθρωποι, –ποτέ δεν μπόρεσαν να μπω μες στο μυαλό τους,– αλλά θαρρώ να πλησιάζω στην αλήθεια.

Ξαφνικά μια μέρα λιγοστέψαμε: από τα δεκαπέντε που βρισκόμαστε, δε μείναμε παρά μονάχα δέκα! Τα πέντε φύγαν, κιόλας, σε μια μέρα! Όλοι, τότε, πρόφεραν συχνά τη λέξη "πόλεμος"... Φαίνεται πως οι άνθρωποι, άμα παραγιομίσουνε τη γη, και δε χωράνε, αρχίζουν και σκοτώνονται με λύσσα μεταξύ τους, κόβουνε τα χέρια και τα πόδια τους, κάνουν κάθε τι δυνατό για να λιγοστέψουν, να μικρύνουν, να κοντήνουν, –κι έτσι, να χωρέσουν! Άλλην εξήγηση δε μπόρεσα να βρω... Και τι εξήγηση μπορεί ποτέ να βρει ένα φτωχό γυαλάκι σαν και μένα; Αλλά γιατί να βγάζουν και τα μάτια τους; Κατά λάθος; Δεν καταλαβαίνω.....

Κι έπειτα λιγοστέψαμε ακόμα πιο πολύ. Βλέποντας τ' αδέρφια μου να φεύγουν ένα-ένα, ένιωσα κάτι σαν παράπονο κι εγώ! Είχα βαρεθεί μες στη βιτρίνα, να κοιτώ τα ίδια και τα ίδια, ήθελα να μπω μες στη ζωή, να καταλάβω κίνηση και δράση, ν' ανακατωθώ με τους ανθρώπους, να ταξιδέψω, να χαρώ, να μάθω... Τ' άλλα τ' αδέρφια μου, θαρρώ, με ειρωνεύονταν, με λέγανε πολύ "ρομαντικό"! Κι αληθινά, ζητούσα νέες συγκινήσεις και περιπέτειες! Αφορμή σ’ εκείνη την αδράνεια, σ’ εκείνη τη φριχτήν ακινησία, ένιωθα πως ήτανε το σπάνιό μου χρώμα. Ποιος θα μπορούσε να με χρειαστεί, με τέτοιο χρώμα σπάνιο, δυσεύρετο, ώστε να ρθει και να μ’ ελευθερώσει;…

Και όμως και σ’ αυτό δεν είχα δίκιο! Δεν είχα δίκιο να τα βάζω με την τύχη μου, ούτε να καταριέμαι τον τεχνίτη μου, που μ’ είχε καταδικασμένο, εξ αιτίας του χρωματισμού μου, να μένω άχρηστο στα βάθη του κουτιού μου, να μη μπορώ να χρησιμέψω κάπου, να δώσω, κάπου, μια παρηγοριά, να φύγω από τη θέση μου, να ζήσω! Βρέθηκε κάποιος, κάποια μέρα, και για μένα!

Ήταν ένα παιδί μελαχρινό, ξαπλωμένο στο νοσοκομείο, –ένας λεβέντης ίσαμε κει πάνω, μ’ έναν επίδεσμο στ’ αριστερό του μάτι, μ’ ένα πανί μαύρο και μεγάλο, περασμένο λοξά στο μέτωπό του! Είχε χάσει το μάτι του στον "πόλεμο" κι εκείνο, από το θραύσμα μιας χειροβομβίδας, –γιατί οι άνθρωποι, καθώς πληροφορηθήκαμε, είχαν και μηχανές για να σκοτώνονται, κι αυτό για πιο μεγάλην ευκολία...

Τον είχαν φέρει στο νοσοκομείο, χτυπημένο και σακατεμένο. Είχε μείνει πέντε μήνες στο κρεβάτι, χαροπαλεύοντας τις δέκα πρώτες μέρες. Αλλά, στο τέλος, τα κατάφερε και γλύτωσε. Όλ' αυτά μου τα ’μαθαν αργότερα οι κουβέντες των δικών του, και του ίδιου... Δεν είχα δει, απ' τον καιρό που ζούσα, παιδί τόσο γλυκό και καλοΐσκιωτο, με τόσο λυγερή κορμοστασιά! Περπατούσε με τα δεκανίκια, αλλά, κατόπι, τα παράτησε κι αυτά. Του ’μεινε μόνο ένα μικρό κούτσαμα, που του ’δινε θαρρείς κι αυτό κάποια καινούργια χάρη. Τ’ αγάπησα, αμέσως μόλις το ’δα!

Όταν πρωτοβγήκαμε στο δρόμο, γύριζαν όλοι το κεφάλι και μας κοίταζαν! Ήμουν, αλήθεια, τόσο ταιριασμένο με τ’ άλλο του, το ζωντανό του μάτι! Ήμουν περήφανο για την καλή μου τύχη...

Γνώρισα την πατρίδα του, το σπίτι του, τη γριά του μάνα και τ' αδέρφια του. Η ζωή μας θα περνούσε μια χαρά, και φαινόταν πως περνούσε ήσυχα. Άρχισα κι εγώ να ξεθαρρεύω...

Αλλά, σ' αυτό το αναμεταξύ, άρχισα να νιώθω κάτι άλλο: το ταίρι μου –το ζωντανό του μάτι– με κοίταζε συχνά μες στον καθρέφτη, με κοίταζε λοξά, και με μισούσε! Αντί, κι εκείνο, να περηφανεύεται που βρήκε την καλή μου συντροφιά, που πέτυχε τόσο καλά το ταίρι του, –με κοίταζε λοξά και με μισούσε! Φαίνεται πως θυμότανε το ζωντανό του ταίρι, και δε μπορούσε να το λησμονήσει! Έβλεπε σε μένα την εικόνα του σα μια θλιβερή πλαστογραφία, –και δε μπορούσε να με συνηθίσει...

Και τι, και τι δεν έκανα, να το παρηγορήσω, να γλυκάνω το βαθύ καημό του! Με κοιτούσε πάντα πικραμένο, μ' έβλεπε σαν παρείσακτο και σαν απατεώνα, σα μια παρωδία τραγική του άλλου του συντρόφου, του φευγάτου, και δάκρυζε κρυφά, και με μισούσε! Του κάκου έπαιρνα τη λάμψη και την έκφραση, κι έκανα, τάχα, τα σπιθοβολήματα του ζωντανού χαμένου του ματιού! Όσο στεκόμουν πιο καλά στο ρόλο μου, τόσο το μάτι τ’ άλλο με μισούσε!

Αυτό το πράμα δε μπορούσε να βαστάξει. Ένιωθα τον εαυτό μου ξένο, χωρίς ελπίδα να φιλιώσουμε ποτέ. Ήμουν σαν ένας σύντροφος μοιραίος, αλλά πολύ πικρός κι ανεπιθύμητος. Ο "γάμος" μας, παρά την ομοιότητα του χρώματος και της αναλογίας, ήταν ένας γάμος "ατυχής"... Και μ’ έπαιρνε και μένα το παράπονο, –αν κι εγώ, ακόμα πιο δυστυχισμένο, δε μπορούσα μήτε να δακρύσω!

Τότε ξαναθυμήθηκα το χάρτινο κουτί μου, το στρωμένο με βαμπάκι στη βιτρίνα. Νοστάλγησα την ήσυχη, την ξένοιαστη ζωή μου, στη μακρινή γωνιά του μαγαζιού, τότε που δε με γύρευε κανένας, τότε που, ανάμεσα σε μένα και τον κόσμο, ήταν βαλμένο –για καλό μας, φαίνεται– και μας χώριζ’ ένα κρύσταλλο χοντρό...

Και το μάτι με κοιτούσε στον καθρέφτη, κι έλιωνε, κάθε μέρα πιο πολύ. Το’ βλεπα να φθίνει, κάθε μέρα, να χάνει τη λαμπράδα και τη θέρμη του, να μαραίνεται σιγά, σαν άρρωστο λουλούδι... Και τ’ όμορφο μελαχρινό παιδί, με τα σπάνια, τα πράσινα τα μάτια, έπειτ’ από μία κρίση πυρετού, μία σύντομη κι αγιάτρευτην αρρώστια, πέθανε ένα βράδυ, ξαφνικά...

Παρακολούθησα το δράμα του θανάτου του. Οι δυο μας τύχες ήταν ενωμένες, ενωμένες πέρ' από το θάνατο! Παρακολούθησα όλη την αγωνία του, μέχρι την τελευταία του πνοή. Ένιωσα την κρυάδα του θανάτου του, την παγερή την ακαμψία του κορμιού του. Άκουσα τα κλάματα της μάνας του, τους λυγμούς και τα ξεφωνητά. Παρακολούθησα την τραγική κηδεία του, –ως την ώρα που μας έθαψαν μαζί...

Κι έπειτα μια βαθύτατη σιγή απλώθηκε τριγύρω μου, για χρόνια. Μες στο χώμα, που μας είχαν βάλει, δεν ακουγόταν τίποτα, μα τίποτα! Όλοι πια μας είχαν λησμονήσει...

Κι ένα βράδυ, κύλησα στα βάθη του κρανίου, –κι έμεινα, για χρόνια, μέσα κει. Θαρρούσα πως κι εγώ είχα πεθάνει...

Έμεινα, δεν ξέρω πόσα χρόνια, μες στο βαθύ κι ατέλειωτο σκοτάδι, –πολλά ή λίγα δε μπορώ να πω, και μήτε που μπορούσα να το μάθω... Συλλογιζόμουν, μες στη μοναξιά μου, τον καιρό που χάζευα στη μακρινή βιτρίνα, με τους κοντούς και τους χοντρούς ανθρώπους, και με τους άλλους, τους ψηλούς και τους ξερακιανούς, μαζί με τ' άλλα τα γυαλένια μου τ' αδέρφια, μες στα θερμόμετρα και μες στα μικροσκόπια! Τα ’βλεπα, όλ' αυτά, σα μέσα σ' όνειρο, στο βαρύ και σκοτεινό μου ύπνο, που μου φαινόταν άσωστος κι ατέλειωτος – και πως θα βαστούσε πια για πάντα...

Κι έπειτα πάλι, για καιρό, έμεινα δίχως όνειρα. Είχα συνηθίσει το σκοτάδι. Δεν είχα μήτε πόθο της ζωής, μήτε την ελπίδα να ξυπνήσω...

Και ξαφνικά, εκεί που δεν το περίμενα, –ύστερ' από δεν ξέρω πόσα χρόνια βουβαμού, μαυρίλας και θανάτου, – μια μέρα, ξαναβρέθηκα στο φως!

Άκουσα, πρώτα, κάποιους ήχους μακρινούς, κάποιους βρόντους, κούφιους και πνιγμένους, που δε μπορούσα να τους εξηγήσω. Αυτοί οι βρόντοι όλο και πλησίαζαν, ώσπου έφτασαν στη θέση που βρισκόμουν... Κι έπειτα, ξαφνικά, είδα τον ήλιο! Έμεινα θαμπωμένο, στην αρχή, σα να’ μουν ένα μάτι ζωντανό, –και χωρίς να ξέρω τι συμβαίνει...

Γιατί μας ξέθαβαν, δεν έμαθα ποτέ. Είδα τ' αδέρφια του παιδιού, τριγύρω μαζωμένα. Η γριά μάνα δεν υπήρχε πια. Δεν έμαθα ποτέ μου τι απόγινε.

Με βρήκαν μες στα βάθη του κρανίου, και μ' έβγαλαν με μάτια δακρυσμένα...

Τότε ξαναθυμήθηκα το ωραίο παλικάρι, σ' όλη τη ζωντανή την ομορφιά του! Θυμήθηκα το μελαψό του πρόσωπο, το πολύ χλωμό, κι όμως σταράτο, και τη λυγερή κορμοστασιά του! Θυμήθηκα τα μαύρα του μαλλιά και το χαριτωμένο κούτσαμά του! Κι έπειτα θυμήθηκα το ταίρι μου, το μάτι το γερό που με μισούσε.... Απ' όλ' αυτά δεν είχε μείνει τίποτα, –τίποτ' άλλο, παρά μια σακούλα κόκαλα, στοιβαγμένα και κιτρινιασμένα...

Και το μάτι το γερό, που με μισούσε, δεν υπήρχε τώρα, μήτ’ εκείνο! Δεν υπήρχα παρά μόνο γω, –απομεινάρι πια, μοναδικό τόσης ζωής και τόσης λεβεντιάς!

Δεν υπήρχα παρά μόνο γω – το τιποτένιο κι άψυχο γυαλάκι, το φτωχό γυαλάκι, το νεκρό, – να ζω, και να θυμίζω στους ανθρώπους τ’ όμορφο παλικάρι, που δε ζούσε, και τα μεγάλα πράσινά του μάτια, – τόσο το φευγάτο, το χαμένο, εκείνο που δε γνώρισα ποτέ μου, όσο και τ’ άλλο, το γερό, το ζωντανό, το μάτι τ’ ασυλλόγιστο κι αχάριστο, που μες στη θλιβερή τυφλότητά του δε θέλησε ποτέ να καταλάβει την πραγματική μου την αξία, και μήτε μπόρεσε ποτέ του, όσο ζούσε, να μ’ αγαπήσει, –και να με συγχωρήσει...









NAPOLEON LAPATHIOTIS (1888-1944) was born in Athens, Greece to a high-ranking military officer (who reached the rank of General and also served as Member of Parliament and Minister of the Army) and to a niece of Prime Minister Harilaos Trikoupis. As a child he studied English, French and Italian, and took piano and painting lessons. He graduated from the Law School in Athens, but never practiced the profession. His first poem was published at the age of 17. Shortly thereafter, he and nine other young writers founded a poetry magazine, in which his early work appeared; however, its publication ceased after ten issues. Following this, he began to have his work published in newspapers, journals and other periodicals. The military and political upheaval during the First World War forced his family to flee to Egypt temporarily. During that period he became acquainted with the poet C.P. Cavafy. His mother died in 1937, his father passing some three years later—an event that would have a profound effect on his life. Addicted to drugs, he was forced to sell his personal library in order to survive. He committed suicide in 1944, shooting himself with one of his father’s pistols inside his family home, which was located in the central Athens district of Exarcheia. His friends raised funds to cover his funeral expenses. 

Lapathiotis’ early poetry was influenced by the Aesthetic Movement, and in particular by the work of Walter Pater and Oscar Wilde. He published manifestos on aestheticism. Openly homosexual, he attempted to react to the asphyxiatingly conservative atmosphere of his day through bold lyrics and provocative appearances. The sorrow that marked his life spurred him, in his final years, to make a shift towards a symbolism characterized by an intensely melancholy tone. In addition to his hundreds of poems, short stories and other prose writings, he also wrote works for the theatre and literary essays, translated literary works and created music compositions.

There has been a resurgence of interest in his work over the past few decades, as witnessed by the reissue of some of his poetry and prose works, and the increasing number of academic studies devoted to his life and oeuvre. 

"The Glass Eye" was first published in 1932, in the magazine Bouqueto.


PANAYOTIS SFALAGAKOS is a freelance Greek-English-Greek translator. He holds a BA and an MA in Political Science, as well as an MA in Translation Studies, with a specialization in Greek-English-Greek literary translation. He is currently a PhD candidate in Modern Greek Studies at the University of Birmingham, UK, and his research project focuses on Modern Greek Literature, and specifically on the works of M. Karagatsis. His work has appeared in numerous journals and other publications.






This work appears with the permission of Messrs Antonios and Alexandros Papandreou, the copyright holders of Napoleon Lapathiotis. Their permission is granted exclusively for this specific work.
The Adirondack Review
WINTER 2013